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20121027
20121104
STATION
CSPAN 7
CNN 6
CNNW 6
CSPAN2 2
MSNBC 2
MSNBCW 2
WTTG 1
LANGUAGE
English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
of faith understand this isn't about any one religious belief. it's about protecting the civil right to make a lifelong commitment to the person you love. join me in supporting question 6. it's the right thing to do. i'm drinkin' a dunkin' latte. i'm in love with my dunkin' latte. it is a treat. they're packed with flavor. it's my kind of latte. try the simply delicious latte everyone can enjoy. america runs on dunkin'! >>> i just separated jim and peter, everything okay. >> yes, calm them down. >> it's close now and -- >> i know. right around the corner. >> less than a week to go. >>> tucker is here with the weather. guess what's going on this weekend? >> what is? >> extra hour to snooze. >> oh, yay! i had forgotten all about it. >> bad news is it will be getting dark at, you know -- >> like at 5:30. >> no, even earlier than that. 4:45. >> what? >> we're going to lose and hour of daylight on the back end of it. >> really early. >> i'll let you know when the sun is going to set sunday but i think it's about 5:15. going to be an educated guess. let me mention the storm, still some sho
? >> i think social issues do mean a great deal to us. when you look at guy marriage as the next civil rights issue of our time. we were seeing if he would take the next step and make it a federal law. when i travel around the country at the end of the day, it is everyone talking about back pocket, money, jobs, employment. >> let's talk about you're talking about pocketbook, talking about economic issues. when you look at the youth vote today, since you've been talking to them, are they more fiscally conservative than perhaps last election, seeing many of them as children of generation x-ers. that generation grew up fiscally challenged and they may have passed some of those ideas to their children. >> that taps into something, yeah. i agree with that. i authentic it explains that we have this sort of entrepreneurial spirit. when i travel around the country, i say what do you want to do when you grow up? a lot of the students i talk to aren't interested -- they are, but they don't talk about being the next lebron james or laid a gaga. they say i would love to be the next steve jobs. it'
series. he had come out on a series looking on civil-rights issues in america. that was a fundamental place for me to learn. i also worked on a documentary series for a long time. i learned by working in production and by immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to the best practices, the thing that happens in an institution where you are not just struggling to make the thing. you are talking about it and you also have community and resources. if you can afford it, that is a powerful route. i happened to learn the hardest way possible, which is by working in production and not doing anything else. >> is that an issue here, the kind of methods, the institutions and the pattern and career that allows people to be trained to do watch-dog type stuff, whether they are journalists or do similar things, are those trying up? -- drying up? >> documentary films are interesting. in some ways, that still exists. in journalism, the apprentice ship model the newspaper used to offer is definitely going away. you have a staff of 10 and you might be able to mentor some nu
was happening with anti-war movement and what was happening with respect to the civil rights movement, and so i would hope that we're going to see more of that. >> how come? >> because young people, they communicate in a lot of different ways and everything moves so fast today that you can set the world on fire in a positive way just through a message that goes through the internet in a way that -- i had to go buy an album or a cartridge, you know. that's old school. >> if you're re-elected, you go into a second term, sasha and malia will be in the midst of their teens. what are you most worried about, malia getting a driver's license, malia going out on a date, or malia being on facebook? >> i'd worry about facebook right now, only because, look, i know the folks at facebook, obviously they've revolutionized the social networks, but malia because she's well known, you know, i'm very keen on her protecting her privacy. she can make her own decisions obviously later as she gets older. but right now, even just for security reasons, she doesn't have a facebook page. dates, that's fine because she
was a student body president there and a college quarterback. he got his start as a civil rights leader there. he was talking to students and reminding them of the sacrifices that their parents and grandparents made when the civil rights movements happened. in durham, he led a march of students to register to vote. they have sunday registration here in north carolina and early registration period there is a two-week period where you can actually vote. there is a two-week window where you can vote. later in the day, we had alicia keys, the singer and songwriter, who had about 1000 people in raleigh at a park edit for atomic late african- american neighborhood and was urging people to vote. in a suburb of raleigh, smithfield, in a tobacco warehouse which is a schumann this warehouse, we had about 5000 people show up to here pat mccrory, the republican for governor and chris christie. this is his third trip to the state. he has campaigned so often, he says he is thinking of moving here. he has campaigned for the republican ticket. host: i'm sure they would miss the governor dearly if he were to
says education is the civil rights issue of our generation. as we narrow the the achievement gap went to raise the expectations of students. my wife and nine went all the way through the schools here. i'm more excited today. we came in first place to a half years ago in race to the top. it is one thing to win a competition and we're implementing it. we announced two months ago that for the school year 10,000 more kids were proficient in math than the year before. >> i wanted to speak to the racial difference. >> the other investment we're making which will help african- american kids and -- is the significant commitment to the early childhood education. we will be increasing over the next five years the percentage of high needs kids who are involved in [indiscernible] there is evidence that shows the most effective economic development investment the state could make is in early childhood education. what we're saying is two things. the early childhood centers that were really good, it is not a financially responsible decision to -- we would have freincreasee reimbursement. they have t
. it began with the passage of the civil rights act in the '60s when the old dixiecrats like jesse helms left the democratic party because it became too racially inclusive and began gradually to take over the republican party. it's so dangerous to have one of our two big parties controlled by extremists because it makes people think that issues are equally divided when they are, in fact, not. they're 70-30 or 60-40. i think our long-term job is to take back the republican party. >> and just very quickly what is your prediction for tuesday? >> you know, it all depends who votes. if it is a lowered voter turnout, which obviously the governor and legislature of florida wants because they have cut the voting time almost in half and increased the ballot to 12 pages or something, then it will be an older, richer, whiter electorate. if it is a higher turnout, then it will be a more inclusive electorate. so a low turnout will elect romney-ryan. a high turnout, a true democratic turnout, will absolutely re-elect obama. >> yeah, and some states, from what i understand, the voting forums are like 30 pag
with opposing the war in chicago, very much part of our civil rights movement. chicago was the most segregated city in the country at the time. baltimore, maryland, was the second. and what concerned us, and we felt that we had read a lot about the history, the treatment, the poor treatment of the french toward the vietnamese, we were funding that war. in the 1950s. france as well. and, do you have any comments on our use of agent orange against the country that, as far as we could find, hadn't done anything to anybody? and were there any observations you came across on the 1968 democratic convention, and do you see any hope for this country learning something rather than perpetuating -- i did meet soldiers who said they saw shell oil trucks crossing the front lines into north vietnam. i don't know whether you came across any ties to the oil industry. as part of this. thank you. >> in terms of agent orange, i didn't actually run across much of that in terms of what i saw of the documents in the united states. it's one of these issues -- i mean, if i were alive in vietnam, i would have opposed
, fred. >> all right, gentlemen, this young man, a junior in pennsylvania has filed this civil rights suit because he says he was the one who was violated. a sexual encounter he had with somebody on a ten-day field trip was videotaped. the school ended up suspending him for "inappropriate behavior." so regard, how will he go about saying he was the one who should not be disciplined, but the ones who carried out the videotape. >> this someone was his girlfriend of two years, the last week or day of their trip, they had resolutions, which were surreptitiously recorded by somebody, shades of tyler clemente in rutgers, the student says please help me, do something here. and they do. they suspend him and his girlfriend and the video maker, who has charges pending in juvenile court. in any event, the school district did not step back for a minute, they didn't appreciate or act on what happened here. they acted insanely, and some moron suspended him and his girlfriend. they will pay the price for this one, fred, trust me, this case will end quickly in a confidential settlement. the school wa
for themselves and what straight couples have right now. host: so why not civil unions? >> it's a very different institution, it is a second class institution. civil unions are ok in some states. they were definitely part of the journey towards marriage. i have a great deal of respect for the states that passed those. but unfortunately the word marriage is the only word that is recognized in federal law approximately 1300 times. so when it comes down to protecting our families it is really only the institution of marriage the right to marry that will give us those protections. i will tell you we are on a journey here as americans continuously on a number of different issues. so we have to understand that we are looking to be treated as equal in the eyes of the law and equal in terms of the common human bonds that we share with all americans. and it is really only marriage that gets you that equal standing with my straight brother and sister. host: so what protections would be different under a marriage than civil unions? >> right now the federal government has a law in place called the defensive
of pennsylvania women. and has been appointed to the executive committee of the leadership conference on civil rights. she has authored many publications and articles including for u.s. a today and the "new york times." she has served as counsel in major litigation cases dealing with sex discrimination in schools, sexual harassment in the workplace, sex discrimination in intercollegiate athletic programs, and pay equity. among other issues. they say if you want a job well done, give it to a busy woman. and it gives me great pleasure to introduce to you a most accomplished and very busy woman. here to talk to us today about the importance of the women's vote and the 2012 election, the founder and copresident of the national women's law center marsha greenberger. >> well, thank you very much. thank you for that extraordinarily generous introduction. from the incomparable judy 11. and i have to tell you what a pleasure it is to be here and i must also confess to a personal relationship that i think had something to do with this invitation. the national women's law center has an incomparable ms. l
urges revenge against mitt romney. what happened to civility? we'll be right back. seems they haven't been moving much lately. but things are starting to turn around because of business people like you. and regions is here to help. with the experience and service to keep things rolling. from business loans to cash management, we want to be your partner moving forward. so switch to regions. and let's get going. together. >> gretchen: welcome back everyone. the presidential election just three days away now. can you imagine that both candidates are going from town to town to town to town in those swing states. what are they saying? remember when president obama talked a lot about civility and how we should all be nice to each other and not really say any words that might be negative. >> steve: how is that working out? >> gretchen: yesterday he used a word that was new to his stump speech. he got boos from the audience when he talked about mitt romney but then he said this. >> at the time the republic congress any senate candidate by the name of mitt rom? i. [boos] >> no, no, no. don't
hope you are right. thank you, sir for joining us live on this saturday morning. >> thanks for having me. >> brian: four minutes until the bottom of the hour. so much for civility on the campaign trail eastward either side. revenge on mitt romney? what revenge? i thought this was their first match. >> steve: she tried to sneak a fast ones at the polls but wound up walking out in handcuffs. what did she do? we got details. >> brian: that hair color looks so natural. ♪ there she goes again. ♪ ♪ [ multiple sounds making melodic tune ] ♪ [ male announcer ] at northrop grumman, every innovation, every solution, comes together for a single purpose -- to make the world a safer place. that's the value of performance. northrop grumman. at legalzoom, we've created a better place to turn for your legal matters. maybe you want to incorporate a business you'd like to start. or protect your family with a will or living trust. legalzoom makes it easy withtep-by-step help when completing your personalized document -- or you can even access an attorney to guide you along. with an "a" rating fr
these guys. at the end of the day, the overwhelming majority of guys in civil service are doing just that. obviously, it's politically astute for christie to be doing it, but he's doing it for a reason -- you genuinely believe this is a guy who wants to do right by his people. barack obama, you're seeing a human being there. and the camera doesn't lie. obviously, will this weigh an election -- obviously, it leans clearly for obama, but what i love about this is what you see with these guys is the same what you see with the guys in the streets of hoboken that were affected. i believe people are overwhelmingly are tremendously decent including politicians, and you're seeing that. >> is it too cynical to read all this in? let's be clear. analysis is happening within the washington political bubble. but i think if you're watching on television, you're seeing chris christie doing what he has to do for his state and the president doing what a president does, arriving in a disaster zone offering consolation but also his federal help. >> yeah. that's all true. but it does have a political impact.
't forget about that. we have to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities. for example he we have continued to make sure we have the right capability to respond to wildfires, hurricane relief, as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we have provide add broad range of essential services today to combatant commanders, that includes intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance for all the geographical combatant commanders. we provide air and missile defense for all the commanders. we provide logistical support for all the geographical combatant commanders. we provide signal communication support to all the geographical combatant commanders. these are key critical missions that people tend not to think about. as we go forward. so it's important that you understand that. we provide key for aviation, fires, information operation, civil affairs, military police, wmd defense capabilities. corps of engineers who are pretty busy today and doing many other things. we have critical components of the military space program. for example, we are responsible for everything from the sa
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)